Michael Moszynski, CEO of LONDON Advertising, talks about how the DUGUUD campaign was designed to take ethical investing ‘out of the City and into the High Street’.

Michael Moszynski, CEO of LONDON Advertising, talks about how the DUGUUD campaign was designed to take ethical investing ‘out of the City and into the High Street’.

I am old enough to remember the ‘Tell Sid’ campaign for the British Gas IPO in 1984 which used bold TV and press ads to persuade the public to buy shares for the first time. I, and one and a half million others, did and which today would be worth more than 10 times what we paid for them.

What people may not remember was prior to this, the number of people who owned shares in this country was tiny. Well today the same could be said for the number of people who own shares in businesses that are seeking to make a positive impact on the planet and society.

What we loved when we first heard about DUGUUD was that the team had an ambition to do the same for ‘impact investing’ – to make it accessible to the general public, not just venture capitalists or hedge fund owners.

 

We also loved the fact that we were told ‘you can do anything you want as we want a campaign that will redefine the sector and get us noticed.’ They then added ‘the only thing you can’t change is the name as it has taken us months to find one we could register’.

The problem was that the brand name they had chosen, High Impact Investor, was based on a name that people in City understood but which we believed would be meaningless to the public.
 

(We subsequently commissioned Kantar to research this as part of a survey of 3,000 UK Adults which confirmed only 10% of people knew what ‘impact investing’ meant. The research also showed that the majority of people would like to invest in companies that are making a positive difference to the planet and society, but the financial services industry has been talking to itself using jargon people don’t understand and failing to gain their trust.)

Alan Jarvie, my creative partner for the last 28 years, went away to think about the challenge and after some deliberation came up with a solution that went against the one thing we were instructed not to change. Our strong recommendation was to rename the brand to what we call ‘the highest order benefit in the category’ and to communicate it in a way that was immediately understood to everyone:

DUGUUD We only invest in companies that do good.
 

To the credit of the client team when we took them through our logic, they unanimously agreed to it on the spot.

The next challenge was how to ensure people would notice ads and remember the brand name. The sad reality is that only 8% of ads are recalled and the brand correctly attributed to them just one day after they have been seen. Given that these days people are bombarded by over 10,000 ads a day this is perhaps not surprising, but the implication is that 92% of the millions spent on media by advertisers is wasted (no longer just the ‘50%’ lamented by the late Lord Leverhulme).

As an agency we are passionate about creating advertising that is simple, stands out and which ensures people will remember the name of the brand. The DUGUUD campaign is a brilliant exemplar of this approach:

Blog

Too many ads these days are too complicated when an advertiser has on average only 1.4 seconds to get their message across. Or when the message could be for any company in the sector and the only branding is their logo in the bottom right-hand corner of the ad.

The other problem is that too many clients chant the mantra that they need a ‘digital first media strategy’ given the amount of time people spend glued to their screens. Well people on average spend 8 hours a day sleeping so on that basis we might as well target ‘sleep’.

Digital media is of course very effective at doing many things as people can ‘buy off the page’ but I defy anyone to show how you can build brand awareness on an ad the size of a postage stamp. (We love Ocean Outdoors super-premium digital sites which slap you round the face. So much so we used them very successfully for our own campaign.)

So, the next thing we loved about the DUGUUD team is that they wanted to run their campaign in refreshingly broadcast media using national TV, Outdoor, Print, and TV Programme Sponsorship. (Don’t just take our word on this, have a look at what media the big successful online/tech brands use. Yup, a lot of TV and Outdoor.)

 

Also given DUGUUD’s passion about the need for openness and transparency, we commissioned the environmental journalist, Lucy Siegle, to interview the DUGUUD team and ask whatever questions she wanted on behalf of potential investors which you can see here.

Also given DUGUUD’s passion about the need for openness and transparency, we commissioned the environmental journalist, Lucy Siegle, to interview the DUGUUD team and ask whatever questions she wanted on behalf of potential investors which you can see here.

We also loved that DUGUUD’s current investments include the award-winning Sterling Suffolk, which produces tomatoes in what has been called “Europe’s cleverest greenhouse.” The semi-closed hydroponic glasshouse is 20% more energy efficient than a traditional one and allows for greater carbon absorption, which also leads to, what I believe to be, better tasting tomatoes.

So, it is a win/win/win as it is good for the planet, good for the investor and good for the consumer.

For us the ‘tomatoes doing good’ story ‘slam dunks’ how DUGUUD will do more good, so we made a film about that too, which you can view here.